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The Russian annexation of Crimea and the gradually unfolding armed conflict over Donbas have thrown these regions into a whirlpool of the media and political debates. At the same time, there is still a lack of sufficiently complex analysis that would step outside of the large macro-regional divisions in presentation of regional specifics of Ukrainians’ attitudes towards Donbas and Crimea and present dynamics of public understanding of what is happening there. The module is aimed to change researchers’ optic. The interconnectedness of the Donbas and Crimea with other regions has acquired critical political importance both at the level of daily interactions of IDPS with their receiving communities and at the level of national discourse. Therefore, they should be studied, not as an “outstanding” or “exotic” cases, but as parts of Ukrainian society that are interconnected with other regions, and thus can be used as prism that can tell something important about the rest of country.

donbas rallyThe module consists of two parts. Maps in the opening part contribute to the reconceptualization of the regionalism In Ukraine by visualizing specifics of inter-regional mobility in Ukraine (as mobility often has a strong impact on intergroup perception and social cohesion). It also shows dynamics of attitudes demonstrated by the residents of different parts of the country towards each other (including the Donbas and Crimea) beginning from the pre-Euromaidan period. The later part of the module analyses the hierarchical position ascribed by the Ukrainians from different regions to such issues as the armed conflict in the East or annexation of Crimea and possible ways of their resolution. The recent presidential election has shown, that desire to end the war and find a diplomatic solution to the conflict over Donbas is among the highest priorities for Ukrainians in all regions. However, this issue can also become a divisive as survey data indicate that readiness to compromises with Russia and list of concessions inhabitants of different regions are willing to make may greatly differ. Therefore, understanding the regional specifics and dynamics of how these events are characterized, what are the main driving forces ascribed to them, and which are the most acceptable options of ending the conflict, is crucial for country’s future political stability and security.

Finally, the module visualizes a new type of unprecedented mobility, caused by the annexation of Crimea and the beginning of the armed conflict in Donbas. These events resulted in displacement of over two million people. Visualizations include number of officially registered IDPs in each oblast between 2015-2019, and society's reaction to the emergence of a new social categories "IDPs from the Crimea" and "IDPs from Donbass" measured through the social distancing towards both groups of Ukrainian IDPs.

Data for this module were collected in small bits from various international and Ukrainian research centers (UNHCR, University of St.Gallen, Center for Social and Marketing studies “Socis”, Info Sapiens, Rating Group Ukraine).

This project is in copyright. If you reproduce any map, please refer to:

  • Maps for March 2013, March 2015 and October-November 2017. Data Source: University of St. Gallen. The survey carried out by the “Rating” (in 2013) and “Socioinform” Centre (in 2015 and 2017) for the University of St Gallen project "Region, Nation and Beyond. An Interdisciplinary and Transcultural Reconceptualization of Ukraine". In all oblasts and the parts of Donbas controlled by the Ukrainian government, personal standardized face-to-face interviews were conducted based on a multi-stage quota. The sample (n=6,000 split proportionally between all oblasts) was aligned with age (respondents aged 18 and older) and gender quotas representative of Ukraine’s profile with respect to the largest administrative units (oblasts), types of settlement (from villages to cities over one million), with a margin of error of approximately 2%.
  • Maps based on the Rating Group Ukraine data, December 2018. Data Source: Rating Group Ukraine; Project “Portraits of Ukraine” November 16-December 10, 2018. In all oblasts and the parts of Donbas controlled by the Ukrainian government, personal standardized face-to-face interviews were conducted based on a multi-stage quota. The sample (n=40,000 split proportionally between all oblasts) was aligned with age and gender quotas representative of Ukraine’s profile with respect to the largest administrative units (oblasts), types of settlement, with a margin of error of approximately 2,4% at the oblast level and 0,5% at the all-Ukrainian level.
  • Maps based on the Info Sapiens Omnibus data, 2019. Source: Info Sapiens Omnibus. Monthly sample includes 1.000 individuals aged 16+. Survey method: face-to-face interviews at respondent's home. Nationally representative sample excludes occupied areas of Crimea and Donbas. The sample (n=12,000) split proportionally between all oblasts) was aligned with age (respondents aged 16 and older), and gender quotas representative of Ukraine’s profile with respect to the largest administrative units (oblasts), types of settlement (from villages to cities over one million), with a margin of error of approximately 2%.
  • Maps based on online media consumption in Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts (GCA and NGCA) survey was conducted by Info Sapiens for Chemonics International Inc.: DG EAST on October 29 – December 9, 2019. Sample (n=1,600). Computer-assisted face-to-face interviews were conducted in government controlled areas of Donetska and Luhanska oblasts. Each subsample represents oblast by age/sex/settlement size according to the data of State Statistics Service of Ukraine as of 1/01/2018. The theoretical sample error does not exceed 3.5% for the subsample with probability 0.95.
  • Maps based on the “Socis” data, November 2017. Data Source: the Center for Social and Marketing studies “Socis”. Personal standardized face-to-face interviews were conducted in all oblasts and the parts of Donbas controlled by the Ukrainian government based on a multi-stage quota. The sample (n=20,000 split proportionally between all oblasts) was aligned with age and gender quotas representative of Ukraine’s profile with respect to the largest administrative units (oblasts), types of settlement, with a margin of error of approximately 1%.
  • Maps based on the “Socis” data, September 2018. Data Source: the Center for Social and Marketing studies “Socis”, Personal standardized face-to-face interviews were conducted in all oblasts and the parts of Donbas controlled by the Ukrainian government based on a multi-stage quota. The sample (n=10,000 split proportionally between all oblasts) was aligned with age and gender quotas representative of Ukraine’s profile with respect to the largest administrative units (oblasts), types of settlement, with a margin of error of approximately 1,5%.
  • Maps based on the “Socis” data, January 2019. Data Source: the Center for Social and Marketing studies “Socis”. Personal standardized face-to-face interviews were conducted in all oblasts and the parts of Donbas controlled by the Ukrainian government based on a multi-stage quota. The sample (n=11,000 split proportionally between all oblasts) was aligned with age and gender quotas representative of Ukraine’s profile with respect to the largest administrative units (oblasts), types of settlement, with a margin of error of approximately 1,5%.
  • Maps illustrating number of officially registered IDPs in each oblast between 2015 and 2019. Data Source: Ukrainian government data provided by the UNHCR.

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